Cadet joins to honor Soldier’s legacy

By: Hannah Van Ree
U.S. Army Cadet Command Public Affairs

Choosing to join the U.S. Army is a big decision. Some Cadets know from a young age that they want to join the military, while others decide in college. For Cadet Paul Klotz a somber day two years ago defined his future and caused him to make the commitment.

“I don’t know, it’s just that funny feeling you get where you want to do something that matters for yourself and for others, and the motivating factor for me to actually join was him,” said Klotz, from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point.

Cadet Paul Klotz from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point chose to join the Army in memory of his late mentor, Green Beret Sgt. Todd Pruett. Klotz graduates from LDAC on Friday, August 3rd at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. U.S. Army photo by Jesse Beals.

The “him” Klotz refers to is the late Green Beret Sgt. Todd Pruett.

Pruett had served in the U.S. Army Special Forces for many years until his honorable discharge. He then rejoined his family floor covering business and coached sports in his West Bend, Wis. community.

“Todd was my friend and mentor. I grew up with his kids and he was my coach growing up,” said Klotz.

Pruett passed away after a courageous battle with acute leukemia. The community had embraced the Soldier, holding bone marrow drives and wearing shirts with the slogan “Do it for Pruett” throughout town.

One of the drives was held at Klotz’s parent’s grocery store, ‘Klotz Piggly Wiggly’ in their hometown.

The retired Soldier passed away on July 4, 2010, a day that changed Klotz’s life.

Klotz, still in college, decided to join the Army ROTC program and become an Officer.

Klotz’s plan is to complete the Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) and graduate college next year with his social science degree, after which he will join the infantry.

He said that his parents understood this was something that he had to do. Read more of this post

Aspiring leader leaves LDAC for good

By Alexandra Kocik
U.S. Cadet Command Public Affairs

Cadet William Wilson recites the oath of office during the graduation ceremony for 3rd Regiment. U.S. Army photo by Jesse Beals

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD – With the sun high above their heads, Cadets run around a large track as sweat pours down their focused faces. The Army Physical Fitness Test marks the first graded test of Cadets at the Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). After years of conditioning for this course, Cadet William Wilson ran around the track for the APFT in the summer of 2011. The first test was going well for Wilson, until he felt a sharp pain.

“It felt like a shotgun blast going through my leg,” Wilson said. “It got worse and worse with each step but I wanted to finish, so I did.”
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“War Eagle” chant in her heart drives military career

Cadet Patricia Ramirez works hard at the Land Navigation course, confident she will complete all of LDAC successfully. U.S. Army photo by Jesse Beals

By Noelle Wiehe
U.S. Army Cadet Command Public Affairs

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. – For Cadet Patricia Ramirez, the plan was always to have the Army play a role in her life.

“I’m either going to marry a military man or be in it,” she said.

When she concluded it wasn’t going to happen the same way it did for her mom – by marriage – she took matters into her own hands. Ramirez’s social life has been at the mercy of the military ever since. Her mom met her step-dad inside the Post Exchange at Riyadh Air Base in Saudi Arabia, where she was working as a civilian.
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A Cadet’s home away from home

By Hannah Van Ree
U.S. Army Cadet Command Public Affairs

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash.- Living in close quarters and sharing basic essentials with a large group of people at the Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) is nothing new to Cadet Parker Thompson, who is one of 18 children.

Thompson is the 9th child and the youngest of his parent’s four biological children. He has 14 adopted brothers and sisters, four being from America and 10 from Brazil.

Cadet Parker Thompson of Wheaton College is a long way from home, but finds the Army family to be similar to his life back home. He graduates from the Leader Development and Assessment Course at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash on Monday, July 9th. U.S. Army photo by Jesse Beals

“Have you ever seen the movie Cheaper by the Dozen? It’s not at all like that,” joked Thompson, explaining that his siblings were rather well behaved, “It’s not easy but there is a lot of joy that comes with it too.”

Thompson has lived in the same old farmhouse his whole life, in the 2,000-person town of Tremont, Ill.

“We have a garden and the kids play outside a lot. I grew up having a playmate at all times. I was never bored,” said Thompson, who plans on graduating from Wheaton College next fall, commissioning and then going to medical school.

Being two days and a wake-up away from graduating from Warrior Forge, Thompson said he has greatly valued his time at LDAC.

“I can’t believe how fast it’s flown by. It seems like just yesterday we were here getting our blood drawn for the first time and now we are here getting it drawn again,” said Thompson, during his last blood drawing.

“LDAC has taught me a lot about trust. Trust in your fellow Cadets, trust in God, trust in cadre, trust in your training and trust in your own intuition and your guts,” said Thompson. Read more of this post

Beating LDAC

Cadet Christopher Nash learned he could beat box in high school and hasn’t stopped since. He is days from graduating from the Leader Development and Assessment Course at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. U.S. Army photo by Jesse Beals

By Hannah Van Ree
U.S. Army Cadet Command Public Affairs

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash.- Cadets at the Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) already have a steady battle rhythm to follow throughout their 29-day challenge, but Cadet Christopher Nash follows a rhythm of his own.

Nash, a 27-year-old active duty soldier from the University of Massachusetts, said that he found out he could make unique sounds in high school and that was just the beginning of his beat boxing career.

“In high school I had some buddies into music and found out I could make a ‘dwoom-dwoom-dwoom’ noise,” said Nash, giving a preview of his fast-paced, rave type echo.

Beat boxing is a musical art form using a person’s mouth, lips, tongue and voice to create instrumental rhythm and beats. Nash has perfected the art and can produce a beat simulating background music instantly.

Nash said he then joined a cappella groups in high school and was the beat boxer in a male a cappella group at his first college. Later, he became a member of the group D.C. Vocals in Virginia, playing shows at venues around the area.
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